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 Bonded Onlay
The opinions and photographs within this web page are not ours. Authors have been credited for the individual posts where they are. - Photos courtesy of Mark Dreyer - www.rxroots.com
From: Mark Dreyer, DMD, PA Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2001 18 14 Subject:bonded onlay This was a neat case. I didn't think about photographing this initially, so didn't get a pre-op photo, but enclosed a pre-op x-ray. For any periodontist that made it past the subject line, yes, perio tx was completed prior to restorative! I'm sure many dentists would have done a crown in this situation. I like this approach much better. Not only does it conserve remaining tooth surface, but there is much less tooth/restoration interface for the patient to maintain, and you don't have to take your margins subgingivally for esthetics. Empress was the material used. In my practice, teeth treated with these restorations almost never blow up. I'm sure it has to do with the fact that I do so little drilling on the tooth. Mostly I just remove the decay and/or old restoration, get my draw, and I'm done.


Mark Dreyer, DMD, PA 3503 13th Street St. Cloud, Fl. 34769
From: Benjamin Schein Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2001 18 43 Mark: I've always feared :>) that adhesive Dentistry (if done right---that's the caveat) would reduce the endo business tenfold, your case is an example as a crown would undoubtedly lead to pulp involvement and in this case it may not. The problem with adhesive Dentistry is that a great many of our colleagues do not do it right so the endo bussines will increase :>)
From: Mark Dreyer, DMD, PA Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2001 18 57 Ben, I went with the 4-step scope from Global. Did I make a very bad choice? The scope hasn't been delivered yet, so I could probably change the order. I mostly went on the recommendation of the representative, Jim Cuba, who seemed to be pretty knowledgeable, and didn't try to up-sell me. Thanks, Mark Dreyer, DMD, PA
From: Molar Del Sud (Ace Dentura) Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2001 19 09 Yeah , I think 4 step with 105mm lens........of course...I could be wrong........ that would be different.:((
From: Benjamin Schein Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2001 19 27 Six step gives you a wider field of view, which is invaluable for including more teeth in the photo, which in turn is needed to evaluate esthetics. The four step is good for endo only or evaluate margins in restorative but for photographic purposes the 6 step is better. Gary in his course, which I just took, and of which I still am digesting the info, included a flyer from a group of restorative dentists. they have a web page I believe. I'll look it up and post it for you. Global, I believe will upgrade you, without losing your initial investment (the first six months) check with their rep. They are a good company and that is why they've captured a big chunk of the market. I also have a Zeiss which I love, but OH boy getting service from them is like pulling teeth (no pun intended). Ben
From: Molar Del Sud (Ace Dentura) Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2001 18 52 Why six step?
From: John J. Stropko, D.D.S. Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2001 20 48 Mark, Change the order to the Protege. Much broader view when needed. I'm sure the rep was trying to do you a favor, but the 6-step much better for all around usage> John Stropko
From: Bill Watson Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2001 20 25 >I also have a Zeiss which I love, but OH boy getting service from them is like >pulling teeth (no pun intended).> It's a great scope but ditto on the service. Bill Watson DDS, MS, FAAOMP, MBA